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Benefits of Custom Computers

John from Carmel Custom Computers shared with us the benefits of a custom built computer.

Here is his suggestions:

Carmel Custom Computers

 
Welcome Home To Portland Festival

As a kick-off to the Antique Engine and Tractor Show, the town of Portland, Indiana will be holding a festival on August 22, 2010. This event will take place in downtown Portland at 4pm and will include several local vendors, homemade ice cream, and various forms of entertainment for children and adults. A short parade of antique tractors and vintage cars will begin at 4:30pm. Individuals and groups of all ages are welcome to come and become acquainted with the small town and its simplistic charm.

 
7 Things You MUST Ask Your Kids Before they Leave for College [guest post]

As college kids get ready to leave we thought this could be some good ideas for parents sending their students off for their first year at college.  The following is a guest post by Vanessa Van Petten, teen author of You’re Grounded! She runs the parenting blog RadicalParenting.com, which is written with teens from the kid’s perspective.

“I am free, I am free, I am free”

I have heard both parents and teens chant this as they pack up the minivan and leave for college.  Yet, parents often watch their kids leave, with tears in their eyes and forget to cover some essential pre-freshman topics.

1) Money

Your child will most likely call you in the first six months asking for more money.  Often times, kids leave for college without any idea or guidelines about how much money they should be spending and what happens if they need to be bailed out.

Essential Talking points:

“We are giving you ______ per month.”
“You can use our credit card for  everything except ____, ____, _____.  These are things you need to pay for on your own either with your savings or from a job.”
“You _______ have your own credit card.”
“If you are in an emergency and need more money, we will loan/give/not give it to you.”

2) Contact

Many parents have an expectation in their mind that they will talk to their child every few days.  Many teens have the expectation in their mind that they will talk to their parent every few weeks.  Then, both go off to college and both get annoyed with the other for calling too little or too much.

Essential Talking points:

“I would like to talk to you ____per week/month.”
“I must talk to you at the very minimum _____ per week/month.”
“Lets make a regular check-in time of ________(Sunday afternoon at 3pm is usually good)”
“If I do not hear from you, I am warning you now, I will call your resident dorm director.”

3) Vacations

When teens leave home, they feel they have no more rules and boundaries—and maybe they don’t.  But they will come home to visit, rules will return. Talk about this now, before they come home for Thanksgiving and realize they no longer can stay out until 4am.

Essential Talking points:

“I know you are free to do whatever you want, but we would love it if you could ______ while at school.”
“Just so you know, you will have more freedom when you come home from breaks, but we still expect  ______curfew,  _____ car rules, ______ amount of family time….”

4) Memories

Too many students leave for school without ever thinking of logging their memories.  Talk to your kids about keeping a journal, photos or video diary online.

Essential Talking points:

“Here is a camera/journal/video camera, please document your first year.”
“Don’t you wish you could see pictures of my bad hairstyle from college? Ok, so make sure to take your own pictures to save for your kids.”

5) Grade Limits

College is to learn.  College is to learn.  I often have to repeat this to rising college freshman.  Make sure your kids know what kind of expectations you have on their grades.  The more specific the better on this one.

Essential Talking points:

“Of course, we want you to do well in college, it would be great if you could keep a ____GPA or higher.”
“In fact, if you go below _____GPA, we will not pay for your school/you will have to quit the sports team….”
“We have access to your transcripts.”
“You need to send us a grade update every ________months/weeks.”

6)  Significant Others

Most likely your child will get a significant other during freshman year.  It is important to talk about what this means for vacations and breaks.  Are you ok with them coming home for Christmas? What if your child wants to go home with them for a break?

Essential Talking points:

“If you want to bring someone home from a vacation this ____ allowed.”
“If you bring someone home from a vacation, they are ____allowed to stay in your room with you.”
“We expect you to come home for the following holidays: _____, _______, ______”
“It would be ok, if you went with a boyfriend or girlfriend on the following holidays/vacations: _______, ________ “

7) Expensive Extra-Curriculars

The last thing you should talk about before they call you mid-October and ask is about expensive social activities.  Talk about the following:

Essential Talking points:

“If you join a sorority or fraternity you will _____ have to pay for your own dues.”
“If you want to go on an expensive spring break trip to Cancun we will _____pay for it/part of it/none of it.”
“If you join the sailing team we will ____ pay for your sailboat and equipment.”

Even if you think your kid would never join the sailing team, talk to him or her about these issues just in case.  Trust me, waiting until they call from their friends cell phone is not a great first way to talk (or argue) about these issues.
Vanessa Van Petten is the teen author of the parenting book “You’re Grounded!” She writes a parenting blog along with 12 other teen writers from the kid’s perspective to help parents.  Her work as a young family peacemaker have been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Teen Vogue, CNN, Fox News, CBS Miami and much more!
http://www.RadicalParenting.com

Articles like this by Vanessa Van Petten:

Horror Stories From My Freshman Year (Teens Leaving Home)

Best School Supply Checklist: College Students

My Ultimate Pre-College Guide for Freshman



 
7 Things You MUST Ask Your Kids Before they Leave for College [guest post]

As college kids get ready to leave we thought this could be some good ideas for parents sending their students off for their first year at college.  The following is a guest post by Vanessa Van Petten, teen author of You’re Grounded! She runs the parenting blog RadicalParenting.com, which is written with teens from the kid’s perspective.

“I am free, I am free, I am free”

I have heard both parents and teens chant this as they pack up the minivan and leave for college.  Yet, parents often watch their kids leave, with tears in their eyes and forget to cover some essential pre-freshman topics.

1) Money

Your child will most likely call you in the first six months asking for more money.  Often times, kids leave for college without any idea or guidelines about how much money they should be spending and what happens if they need to be bailed out.

Essential Talking points:

“We are giving you ______ per month.”
“You can use our credit card for  everything except ____, ____, _____.  These are things you need to pay for on your own either with your savings or from a job.”
“You _______ have your own credit card.”
“If you are in an emergency and need more money, we will loan/give/not give it to you.”

2) Contact

Many parents have an expectation in their mind that they will talk to their child every few days.  Many teens have the expectation in their mind that they will talk to their parent every few weeks.  Then, both go off to college and both get annoyed with the other for calling too little or too much.

Essential Talking points:

“I would like to talk to you ____per week/month.”
“I must talk to you at the very minimum _____ per week/month.”
“Lets make a regular check-in time of ________(Sunday afternoon at 3pm is usually good)”
“If I do not hear from you, I am warning you now, I will call your resident dorm director.”

3) Vacations

When teens leave home, they feel they have no more rules and boundaries—and maybe they don’t.  But they will come home to visit, rules will return. Talk about this now, before they come home for Thanksgiving and realize they no longer can stay out until 4am.

Essential Talking points:

“I know you are free to do whatever you want, but we would love it if you could ______ while at school.”
“Just so you know, you will have more freedom when you come home from breaks, but we still expect  ______curfew,  _____ car rules, ______ amount of family time….”

4) Memories

Too many students leave for school without ever thinking of logging their memories.  Talk to your kids about keeping a journal, photos or video diary online.

Essential Talking points:

“Here is a camera/journal/video camera, please document your first year.”
“Don’t you wish you could see pictures of my bad hairstyle from college? Ok, so make sure to take your own pictures to save for your kids.”

5) Grade Limits

College is to learn.  College is to learn.  I often have to repeat this to rising college freshman.  Make sure your kids know what kind of expectations you have on their grades.  The more specific the better on this one.

Essential Talking points:

“Of course, we want you to do well in college, it would be great if you could keep a ____GPA or higher.”
“In fact, if you go below _____GPA, we will not pay for your school/you will have to quit the sports team….”
“We have access to your transcripts.”
“You need to send us a grade update every ________months/weeks.”

6)  Significant Others

Most likely your child will get a significant other during freshman year.  It is important to talk about what this means for vacations and breaks.  Are you ok with them coming home for Christmas? What if your child wants to go home with them for a break?

Essential Talking points:

“If you want to bring someone home from a vacation this ____ allowed.”
“If you bring someone home from a vacation, they are ____allowed to stay in your room with you.”
“We expect you to come home for the following holidays: _____, _______, ______”
“It would be ok, if you went with a boyfriend or girlfriend on the following holidays/vacations: _______, ________ “

7) Expensive Extra-Curriculars

The last thing you should talk about before they call you mid-October and ask is about expensive social activities.  Talk about the following:

Essential Talking points:

“If you join a sorority or fraternity you will _____ have to pay for your own dues.”
“If you want to go on an expensive spring break trip to Cancun we will _____pay for it/part of it/none of it.”
“If you join the sailing team we will ____ pay for your sailboat and equipment.”

Even if you think your kid would never join the sailing team, talk to him or her about these issues just in case.  Trust me, waiting until they call from their friends cell phone is not a great first way to talk (or argue) about these issues.
Vanessa Van Petten is the teen author of the parenting book “You’re Grounded!” She writes a parenting blog along with 12 other teen writers from the kid’s perspective to help parents.  Her work as a young family peacemaker have been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Teen Vogue, CNN, Fox News, CBS Miami and much more!
http://www.RadicalParenting.com

Articles like this by Vanessa Van Petten:

Horror Stories From My Freshman Year (Teens Leaving Home)

Best School Supply Checklist: College Students

My Ultimate Pre-College Guide for Freshman



 
7 Things You MUST Ask Your Kids Before they Leave for College [guest post]

As college kids get ready to leave we thought this could be some good ideas for parents sending their students off for their first year at college.  The following is a guest post by Vanessa Van Petten, teen author of You’re Grounded! She runs the parenting blog RadicalParenting.com, which is written with teens from the kid’s perspective.

“I am free, I am free, I am free”

I have heard both parents and teens chant this as they pack up the minivan and leave for college.  Yet, parents often watch their kids leave, with tears in their eyes and forget to cover some essential pre-freshman topics.

1) Money

Your child will most likely call you in the first six months asking for more money.  Often times, kids leave for college without any idea or guidelines about how much money they should be spending and what happens if they need to be bailed out.

Essential Talking points:

“We are giving you ______ per month.”
“You can use our credit card for  everything except ____, ____, _____.  These are things you need to pay for on your own either with your savings or from a job.”
“You _______ have your own credit card.”
“If you are in an emergency and need more money, we will loan/give/not give it to you.”

2) Contact

Many parents have an expectation in their mind that they will talk to their child every few days.  Many teens have the expectation in their mind that they will talk to their parent every few weeks.  Then, both go off to college and both get annoyed with the other for calling too little or too much.

Essential Talking points:

“I would like to talk to you ____per week/month.”
“I must talk to you at the very minimum _____ per week/month.”
“Lets make a regular check-in time of ________(Sunday afternoon at 3pm is usually good)”
“If I do not hear from you, I am warning you now, I will call your resident dorm director.”

3) Vacations

When teens leave home, they feel they have no more rules and boundaries—and maybe they don’t.  But they will come home to visit, rules will return. Talk about this now, before they come home for Thanksgiving and realize they no longer can stay out until 4am.

Essential Talking points:

“I know you are free to do whatever you want, but we would love it if you could ______ while at school.”
“Just so you know, you will have more freedom when you come home from breaks, but we still expect  ______curfew,  _____ car rules, ______ amount of family time….”

4) Memories

Too many students leave for school without ever thinking of logging their memories.  Talk to your kids about keeping a journal, photos or video diary online.

Essential Talking points:

“Here is a camera/journal/video camera, please document your first year.”
“Don’t you wish you could see pictures of my bad hairstyle from college? Ok, so make sure to take your own pictures to save for your kids.”

5) Grade Limits

College is to learn.  College is to learn.  I often have to repeat this to rising college freshman.  Make sure your kids know what kind of expectations you have on their grades.  The more specific the better on this one.

Essential Talking points:

“Of course, we want you to do well in college, it would be great if you could keep a ____GPA or higher.”
“In fact, if you go below _____GPA, we will not pay for your school/you will have to quit the sports team….”
“We have access to your transcripts.”
“You need to send us a grade update every ________months/weeks.”

6)  Significant Others

Most likely your child will get a significant other during freshman year.  It is important to talk about what this means for vacations and breaks.  Are you ok with them coming home for Christmas? What if your child wants to go home with them for a break?

Essential Talking points:

“If you want to bring someone home from a vacation this ____ allowed.”
“If you bring someone home from a vacation, they are ____allowed to stay in your room with you.”
“We expect you to come home for the following holidays: _____, _______, ______”
“It would be ok, if you went with a boyfriend or girlfriend on the following holidays/vacations: _______, ________ “

7) Expensive Extra-Curriculars

The last thing you should talk about before they call you mid-October and ask is about expensive social activities.  Talk about the following:

Essential Talking points:

“If you join a sorority or fraternity you will _____ have to pay for your own dues.”
“If you want to go on an expensive spring break trip to Cancun we will _____pay for it/part of it/none of it.”
“If you join the sailing team we will ____ pay for your sailboat and equipment.”

Even if you think your kid would never join the sailing team, talk to him or her about these issues just in case.  Trust me, waiting until they call from their friends cell phone is not a great first way to talk (or argue) about these issues.
Vanessa Van Petten is the teen author of the parenting book “You’re Grounded!” She writes a parenting blog along with 12 other teen writers from the kid’s perspective to help parents.  Her work as a young family peacemaker have been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Teen Vogue, CNN, Fox News, CBS Miami and much more!
http://www.RadicalParenting.com

Articles like this by Vanessa Van Petten:

Horror Stories From My Freshman Year (Teens Leaving Home)

Best School Supply Checklist: College Students

My Ultimate Pre-College Guide for Freshman



 
7 Things You MUST Ask Your Kids Before they Leave for College [guest post]

As college kids get ready to leave we thought this could be some good ideas for parents sending their students off for their first year at college.  The following is a guest post by Vanessa Van Petten, teen author of You’re Grounded! She runs the parenting blog RadicalParenting.com, which is written with teens from the kid’s perspective.

“I am free, I am free, I am free”

I have heard both parents and teens chant this as they pack up the minivan and leave for college.  Yet, parents often watch their kids leave, with tears in their eyes and forget to cover some essential pre-freshman topics.

1) Money

Your child will most likely call you in the first six months asking for more money.  Often times, kids leave for college without any idea or guidelines about how much money they should be spending and what happens if they need to be bailed out.

Essential Talking points:

“We are giving you ______ per month.”
“You can use our credit card for  everything except ____, ____, _____.  These are things you need to pay for on your own either with your savings or from a job.”
“You _______ have your own credit card.”
“If you are in an emergency and need more money, we will loan/give/not give it to you.”

2) Contact

Many parents have an expectation in their mind that they will talk to their child every few days.  Many teens have the expectation in their mind that they will talk to their parent every few weeks.  Then, both go off to college and both get annoyed with the other for calling too little or too much.

Essential Talking points:

“I would like to talk to you ____per week/month.”
“I must talk to you at the very minimum _____ per week/month.”
“Lets make a regular check-in time of ________(Sunday afternoon at 3pm is usually good)”
“If I do not hear from you, I am warning you now, I will call your resident dorm director.”

3) Vacations

When teens leave home, they feel they have no more rules and boundaries—and maybe they don’t.  But they will come home to visit, rules will return. Talk about this now, before they come home for Thanksgiving and realize they no longer can stay out until 4am.

Essential Talking points:

“I know you are free to do whatever you want, but we would love it if you could ______ while at school.”
“Just so you know, you will have more freedom when you come home from breaks, but we still expect  ______curfew,  _____ car rules, ______ amount of family time….”

4) Memories

Too many students leave for school without ever thinking of logging their memories.  Talk to your kids about keeping a journal, photos or video diary online.

Essential Talking points:

“Here is a camera/journal/video camera, please document your first year.”
“Don’t you wish you could see pictures of my bad hairstyle from college? Ok, so make sure to take your own pictures to save for your kids.”

5) Grade Limits

College is to learn.  College is to learn.  I often have to repeat this to rising college freshman.  Make sure your kids know what kind of expectations you have on their grades.  The more specific the better on this one.

Essential Talking points:

“Of course, we want you to do well in college, it would be great if you could keep a ____GPA or higher.”
“In fact, if you go below _____GPA, we will not pay for your school/you will have to quit the sports team….”
“We have access to your transcripts.”
“You need to send us a grade update every ________months/weeks.”

6)  Significant Others

Most likely your child will get a significant other during freshman year.  It is important to talk about what this means for vacations and breaks.  Are you ok with them coming home for Christmas? What if your child wants to go home with them for a break?

Essential Talking points:

“If you want to bring someone home from a vacation this ____ allowed.”
“If you bring someone home from a vacation, they are ____allowed to stay in your room with you.”
“We expect you to come home for the following holidays: _____, _______, ______”
“It would be ok, if you went with a boyfriend or girlfriend on the following holidays/vacations: _______, ________ “

7) Expensive Extra-Curriculars

The last thing you should talk about before they call you mid-October and ask is about expensive social activities.  Talk about the following:

Essential Talking points:

“If you join a sorority or fraternity you will _____ have to pay for your own dues.”
“If you want to go on an expensive spring break trip to Cancun we will _____pay for it/part of it/none of it.”
“If you join the sailing team we will ____ pay for your sailboat and equipment.”

Even if you think your kid would never join the sailing team, talk to him or her about these issues just in case.  Trust me, waiting until they call from their friends cell phone is not a great first way to talk (or argue) about these issues.
Vanessa Van Petten is the teen author of the parenting book “You’re Grounded!” She writes a parenting blog along with 12 other teen writers from the kid’s perspective to help parents.  Her work as a young family peacemaker have been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Teen Vogue, CNN, Fox News, CBS Miami and much more!
http://www.RadicalParenting.com

Articles like this by Vanessa Van Petten:

Horror Stories From My Freshman Year (Teens Leaving Home)

Best School Supply Checklist: College Students

My Ultimate Pre-College Guide for Freshman



 
Flavors of Fishers

Flavor of Fishers is an event sponsored by the Fishers Chamber of Commerce.  Join the event for great food, fun activities for adults and children and great entertainment.

The event is this Saturday, July 31 from noon to 10 pm.

Admission tickets are $5 in advance for adults. Children 12 and under are free!   Tickets are $7 at the door.

Tickets are available at all Fishers Marsh Supermarkets, Fishers Farmers Market and the Fishers Chamber Office in the Fishers Train Station.

Food tickets will be available for purchase in $1 increments at the event.

Directions:

The Flavor of Fishers will be held on USA Parkway Circle, which is located between Sallie Mae and the FORUM Credit Union in Fishers. The only entrance/exit will be via the Sallie Mae parking lot.

From I-69:
East on 116th Street (Exit 5) and follow to Cumberland Road.
Right onto Cumberland Road. Follow to 106th Street.
Right onto 106th Street. Follow to USA Parkway.
Right onto USA Parkway. Follow to Sallie Mae parking lot.

 
The History of the Carmel Fire Department

The Carmel Fire Department has a created a great video sharing their history.  It is very well done and we wanted to share it with you, please click here.

 
Enter your home in a House Decorating Contest

Enter your home in Carmel Clay Parks & Recreation’s House Decorating Contest. Whether you go all “Griswold” or have tastefully decorated your home we would love to see your creativity in this holiday contest. The judging categories will be most “Griswold” like, most creative and most tactfully done. The top entries will receive a prize. We will only judge houses within Clay Township. Pre-registration is required. Please download a contest form on the website at www.carmelclayparks.com.

 
Halloween safety guidelines and tips

The City of Carmel has announced Trick-or-Treat hours for Halloween.  Trick-or-Treat hours will be on Saturday, October 31, 2009 from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM.

The Carmel Police Department offers the following safety tips for Halloween:

·         Give and accept wrapped or packaged candy only.

·         Have children bring treats home for adult inspection before they are eaten.

·         An adult should accompany younger children.

·         Go out in daylight and carry a flashlight in case of delay.

·         Stay within your neighborhood; only visit homes you know.

·         Use make-up or face paint instead of masks.  If masks are used, make sure the child has good visibility.

·         Make sure costumes are flame-retardant and sized to fit the child.

·         Put reflective tape on costumes.

·         Watch for vehicle traffic and use caution when crossing the street.

·         Drive slowly all evening.

·         Keep costumed children away from pets. The pets may not recognize the child and become frightened.

Police cars will be patrolling the neighborhoods to ensure everyone’s safety.  If you see or find anything suspicious, please call the Carmel Police Department at 571-2580 or Emergency 911.

 
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